U.S. Youth soccer selects Solar Soccer Club as part of prestigious Development Academy

DA_primary_2color

U.S. Soccer announced that Solar Soccer Club has been selected as one of twenty-five clubs nationwide to participate in the newly created Girls’ Development Academy (DA).  The DA, scheduled to launch in the fall of 2017, was created in an effort to accelerate the development of and to create world-class, female soccer players by providing a unified focus while maximizing player development across the country.

“We are extremely proud and honored to be recognized as one of the top girls programs in the country. We have been successfully part of USSF boy’s DA for the last 8 years. Our focus remains excellence through player development both on and off the field. Solar players are recognized all around the country as very technical and creative with great decision making capacity.” Adrian Solca, Executive Director of Coaching Elite Programs, Technical Director and Head of Soccer Operations “The key to our girls success at the national level has been joining Solar at the youth academy level where our coaches work the proven soccer curriculum that Solar has developed to mold these kids into national level talent.”

U.S. Soccer started its Development Academy Program for boys in 2007 and the program, which currently consists of 152 clubs across five age groups, serves as the elite player development model for the country and has significantly improved the everyday environment for players, coaches and clubs. The institution of a Development Academy for girls is part of U.S. Soccer’s global leadership position in women’s soccer and will impact thousands of players.

From the start, the program will feature three combined age groups in the Girls’ Development Academy: U-14/15, U-16/17 and U-18/19. Clubs will be expected to train a minimum of four times a week. The players in the Girls’ Development Academy clubs will play exclusively within the Academy program and will not play in any outside competition, such as ODP or high school.

The use of combined age groups will require clubs to form teams with a balanced roster of players from two distinct birth years. The games will be scouted by U.S. Soccer and the program will serve as a pathway to U.S. Soccer’s Youth National Teams.